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Engineers are bad communicators: 6 ways to fix this, part 2

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This is a continuation of the previous post about how to improve communication amongst engineers, their teams, and their managers. Read the rest of this entry »

Engineers are bad communicators: six ways to fix this (part 1)

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Awhile back, I posted about “Best Practices for Communicating between Engineers“.  This time around, I wanted to be a little more specific about how basic communication blunders can be avoided.  I’ve seen countless violations of these rules, and they always seem so easy to fix.

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Are Engineers Good at Fixing Things?

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Are engineers good at fixing things?  Or, more specifically, do the skills acquired from en engineering degree / engineering job lend themselves to the basic household issues that always seem to pop up?  The reason I pose the question is that I’m often asked, “Why don’t you know how to fix a leaky faucet, you’re an engineer?”  Or, since many of my acquaintances know the discipline in which I received my degree (Electrical Engineering), the question might be, “Why don’t you know how to install a new overhead light?”  My responses are always short and to the point: “I don’t know because I was never taught,” and the questioner always walks away decidedly unimpressed.

I draw two main conclusions from these mock conversations: Read the rest of this entry »

What happens after a engineering project is posted?

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The idea behind Industrial Interface is pretty simple.  Engineers need stuff and suppliers sell stuff.  We put the two groups together in a very efficient way.  An engineer describes what she is looking for in detail, and our system puts her project in front of relevant suppliers who might be able to help.  If they can help, they pay us a fee (to encourage high quality connections and keep the service running) and then they can contact her.  That sure was simple.  Now I’m going to give you the details. Read the rest of this entry »

Why purchasing agents and engineers hate each other! (Guest Post)

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In general, purchasing agents have a good deal of disdain for engineers (and probably vice-versa).  This doesn’t have to be the case, but it generally is.  Below is a list of reasons why this often happens.  These two groups rarely work together in harmony, but with a little effort they probably can.

In my experience as a finder of hard to find metals, I get inquiries from buyers on a daily basis for metals, forms, sizes and quantities that are simply not available from US metal suppliers. Typically, the buyer has received a print from a client for a new widget designed by an engineer who has searched high and low to find “the perfect material” for his or her new design.

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Cultivate Innovation: What Companies, Managers, and Engineers Can Do

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In past blog posts (here and here), I discussed change in the high-tech design workplace.  Today’s blog is about innovation: the driving force for profit in this market.  Companies who deliver the newest, best-performing, most-reliable products to market are almost always the most successful.  This requires an efficient company streamlined to foster, cultivate, and encourage designers to come up with cutting-edge ideas on a daily basis. Read the rest of this entry »

5 Reasons Engineers Call Sales Reps Before They Google

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It takes a tremendous amount of time and skill to be the first person called about a problem.  Below are five tips that helped me become more than just a Sales Engineer.

1. Know Your Stuff – Become a RESOURCE

If you know your products and services inside and out, great!  You can go meet with engineers,  be an awesome order taker, and repeat the same spiel like a broken record.  Now, you know your competitors products TOO!  You are starting to become dangerous now because you understand the landscape of available products and can competitively sell.  Finally, you understand the applications that your products are used in.  YOU just became a resource to engineers as opposed to just another salesperson.  This is the factor that separates the amateurs from the pros!

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