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Top 10 features to get more leads from your industrial website

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1) Contact info:

Make your contact information readily available on every page of your site, and make sure it is easy to find. The most important activity a user can take on your website is to contact your highly skilled, highly paid, and competent sales force. Potential customers are looking for information and you need to make it easy for them to get answers that they can’t find on your site. Besides, unless you operate an online store, it is impossible for you to make even one dollar without a customer calling your sales team. Put your contact information at the top of every page in big bright text.

Get the next 9 tips over at our industrial website development blog.

Engineer creates own heart valve to save his life

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In 2000, Tal Golesworthy, a British engineer, was told that he suffers from Marfan syndrome, a disorder of the connective tissue that often causes rupturing of the aorta. The only solution then available was the pairing of a mechanical valve and a highly risky blood thinner. To an engineer like Golesworthy, that just wasn’t good enough. So he constructed his own implant that does the job better than the existing solution–and became the first patient to try it.

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Best Handoff Practices for Design Teams

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One of the most difficult engineering processes to nail down is a complex design handoff from one team to another.  Awhile back, I discussed this briefly using a football analogy.  I want to expand on that a little today:

  • What makes a handoff so difficult?
  • Why does so much information get lost?
  • Why do teams inherently place blame on each other when it goes poorly?

Other than the basic communication issues between engineers (that we’ve discussed ad nauseum here, here, and here), there are specific issues with an engineering handoff that make it difficult.

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Engineers are bad communicators: six ways to fix this (part 1)

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Awhile back, I posted about “Best Practices for Communicating between Engineers“.  This time around, I wanted to be a little more specific about how basic communication blunders can be avoided.  I’ve seen countless violations of these rules, and they always seem so easy to fix.

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Finding Better Ways To Pour Coffee

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courtesy: David Yanko of Virtual Saskatchewan

This blog is about “finding better ways to pour coffee.”  At the risk of sounding like a bureaucratically-generated cliche, it’s a little like a more focused “think outside the box,” which I hate.  Allow me to explain what I mean, starting with a quick story.

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Electrical Engineering Blog – Guest Post

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Picture 2

This is a guest post by the moderator of the Electrical Engineering Blog.  It’s a great blog going into the technical details of many interesting and useful facets of electrical engineering and design.

Electrical engineering BLOG was launched in April 2009 by a group of enthusiasts in the field of electrical installation and energy management (mainly based on IEC standards).

With these passionate people, we have created an environment for collaboration and exchange, and we wish to use this Blog to share our current experience as well as our questions about the future – to elicit reactions from others and to discover new concrete ideas, as well as technical and practical tips.

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Sustainable Energy: Best. Infographic. Ever.

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wind-turbine

Scientific American has created a ridiculously interesting infographic on sustainable energy sources.  The article outlines a plan to get the world off of fossil fuels in 20 years.  That’s 100% clean, sustainable energy by 2030.  Although not feasible for a number of economic and political reasons, it is still damn interesting to see how the authors (Mark Z. Jacobson and Mark A. Delucchi) plan this out.  Give it a good read, there are a few surprises in there, particularly re: wind vs. solar.

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General Atomics Makes a Very, Very Large Gun

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railgun-8

Above is how a basic info graphic explaining how a railgun works.  Below is the General Atomic’s new Blitzer Railgun’s test apparatus.

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